08 Dec 2016

IMPORTANT FACTS ABOUT RELATIVE PRONOUNS

IMPORTANT FACTS ABOUT RELATIVE PRONOUNS a) In defining clauses we do not use a possessive adjective (my, our, your, his, her, their, its) before the noun/antecedent of the relative pronoun, rather we use THE; e.g. 1. The car that you have needs servicing. (not YOUR CAR) 2. The frock which

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08 Dec 2016

COMPOUND RELATIVE PRONOUNS

COMPOUND RELATIVE PRONOUNS Some relative pronouns are such which have EVER, SO, SOEVER in their end like WHOEVER, WHOSOEVER, WHOSO, WHATSOEVER, WHICHEVER; they are called compound relative pronouns.; e.g. 1. Whoever comes late will be punished. (WHOEVER = anyone who) 2. You can do whatever you like. (WHATEVER = anything)

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08 Dec 2016

POSITION OF PREPOSITIONS IN RELATIVE CLAUSES

POSITION OF PREPOSITIONS IN RELATIVE CLAUSES Prepositions normally come before their nouns or pronouns. In the following constructions, however, it is possible to move the preposition to the end of the sentence, but informally only; e.g. In questions beginning with a preposition + WHOM/WHAT/WHOSE/WHICH/WHERE 1. To whom was she talking?

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08 Dec 2016

POSITION OF RELATIVE PRONOUNS

POSITION OF RELATIVE PRONOUNS To make the meaning clear the relative pronoun should be kept extreme close to its antecedent. To understand this, see it 1. The girl who died here was the daughter of Dr Verma. 2. The girl was the doctor of Dr Verma who died here. [The

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08 Dec 2016

OMISSION OF RELATIVE PRONOUNS

OMISSION OF RELATIVE PRONOUNS a) The relative pronoun can be removed if it’s in objective case of a defining clause; e.g. 1. She is the woman whom I desire. = She is the woman I desire. 2. He is the author that you like most. = He is the author

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08 Dec 2016

Uses of ‘WHAT’ as a relative pronoun

Uses of ‘WHAT’ WHAT as a relative pronoun can only be used for things expressing the meaning THAT WHICH, THOSE WHICH, THE THING WHICH, THE THINGS WHICH; e.g. 1. What he says is not true. (here WHAT = that which) 2. What cannot be cured must be endured. (here WHAT

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08 Dec 2016

Uses of ‘AS’ — relative pronoun

Uses of ‘AS’  1. Use AS after SUCH A) Use AS after SUCH + NOUN; not WHO, WHOM, WHICH or THAT; e.g. 1. He is not such a good man as I expected. (not WHOM) 2. Yours is not such a serious problem as mine. (not WHICH) B) USE AS

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08 Dec 2016

Uses of ‘THAT’ as a relative pronoun

Uses of ‘THAT’ as a relative pronoun a) THAT as a relative pronoun can be used in both nominative and objective cases for human beings as well as things, means it can take place of WHO, WHOM and WHICH. But it can only be used in defining clauses, never in

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08 Dec 2016

Uses of ‘WHICH’ as a relative pronoun

Uses of ‘WHICH’ as a relative pronoun WHICH is used for animals and lifeless things only. Unlike WHO both the subjective and objective cases are the same for it; means we use WHICH for subjective as well as objective case. 1. The dog which barked at him did not bite

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08 Dec 2016

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN USAGE OF ‘WHO’ AND ‘WHOM’

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN USAGE OF ‘WHO’ AND ‘WHOM’ The main confusion between their uses is because of conversational language as WHO is seen being used frequently in place of WHOM. But in standard English both the words should be used according to the rules associated. WHO WHO can only be used

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